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Ads constantly promote items we can’t live without. Resist!

22 Jul

 

16 things you don’t need

Every waking hour, consumers are bombarded with deals. Online and on TV, in magazines and on the sides of buses, ads show us objects we can’t possibly live without.

Except that we usually can. How do you suppose people managed before greeting card companies made birthday cards “from the cat” or “from me and the dog”? Before applesauce came in tubes? Before we started thinking our blankets needed sleeves?

This list of 16 things you don’t need is by no means exhaustive, but it’s a start.

Disposable income = disposable items

1. Bottled water.
“It’s more expensive than gasoline . . . $6.40 per gallon for a liquid I can get for free at home,” writes Karla Bowsher at Money Talks News. If you live where the water tastes weird (howdy, Phoenix!), get yourself a filter. Bowsher’s article lists top-rated models that start at under $20.

2. Paper plates. For a picnic in the park, maybe. But why not get a set of unbreakable dishes for picnics, barbecues and visits from the grandbabies? That’s certainly greener and ultimately cheaper if you shop thrift stores and yard sales.

3. Paper napkins. Notice a pattern here? Reusable beats disposable any time. I got six cloth napkins for a quarter at a rummage sale; check post-holiday clearance sales, too. Or buy a fabric remnant and sew your own.

4. Paper cups in the bathroom. If you’re that concerned about germs, carry the cup to the kitchen each morning and toss it in the dishwasher. Note: Some people “cup” their palms and bring water to their mouths. Just sayin’.

5. Disposable hand towels. I couldn’t believe my eyes when I first saw these advertised. Neither could Mrs. Money of the Ultimate Money Blog: “The last thing we need is another disposable product, especially one that is pretty much useless and replaces something that has worked well for so many years.” What she said.

Use and toss
6. Disposable flossers. Bathrooms sure are full of, um, waste. Rolls of floss go on sale all the time.

7. Name-brand OTC meds. Compare ingredient labels for any over-the-counter medications you need; when in doubt, talk to the pharmacist. Tip: Know what things cost since name-brand pills might be cheaper with a sale plus coupon and/or rebate.

8. Sandwich bags. No need to buy and toss, buy and toss. Put your PBJs in a reusable container.

9. Lunch bags. They’re still for sale, but I don’t know why. Get yourself a reusable lunchbox or lunch bag. (I found mine in the free box at a yard sale.)

10. Ringtones. Your phone came with a ringer installed. Use it.

11. Diaper Genie.
A mechanized trashcan just for nappies? Throw them in the household garbage just as people did back in the dark ages.

Dogs don’t celebrate Halloween
12. DVDs.
Be honest: How many of your DVDs have been watched more than once? Now: Add up what you’ve spent on them. When your headache goes away, remember you can probably get DVDs free from the public library.

13. Books.
Libraries have books, too. Unless you plan to read a title numerous times (see “DVDs,” above) why are you dropping $30 per hardback? Those best-sellers show up pretty quickly in used-book shops, yard sales and thrift stores.

14. Magazine subscriptions. Are you reading the ones you have? Then why keep subscribing? Your favorites may be available for free at the library. (What swell places libraries are.)

15. Pet costumes. Do I really have to explain?

16. Snuggies. First, put your bathrobe on backward. Next, congratulate yourself on all the money you just saved.

Source: click here

 

This Is How You Beat The Tea Party?

20 Jun

Save the Troy Library “Adventures In Reverse Psychology

With no budget and just a few weeks to do it, the folks in this town kicked butt.

The city of Troy, Michigan was facing a budget shortfall, and was considering closing the Troy Public Library for lack of funds. Even though the necessary revenues could be raised through a miniscule tax increase, powerful anti-tax groups in the area were organized against it. A vote was scheduled amongst the city’s residents, to shut the library or accept the tax increase, and Leo Burnett Detroit decided to support the library by creating a reverse psychology campaign. Yard signs began appearing that read: “Vote to Close Troy Library on August 2nd – Book Burning Party on August 5th.” No one wants to be a part of a town that burns books, and the outraged citizens of Troy pushed back against the “idiotic book burners” and ultimately supported the tax increase, thus ensuring the library’s survival.

 

Happy “Wake-Up Day”!

11 May
Happy “Wake-Up Day”!

 

The movie is called “Owned & Operated” and it’s about the world and about society. It’s an attempt to show the world not just as it is, but also as it could be, using Video, Audio, Images, and quotes collected from every corner of the internet… and using all those things, it attempts to create a single narrative thread about these topics… through these contributions of hundreds of different people.

 

The idea is to wake people up, and get them thinking about things they may not yet have been thinking about. Because honestly, it’s time to wake the f*** up.

 

The Syrian people’s gift to us

7 Mar
Syria protest:Powered by millions of online actions and donations from 75,000 of us, our community is playing a central role in supporting the Syrian people as they persist in peaceful protest against all odds. Together, we’re empowering citizen journalism, smuggling in medical supplies and western journalists, and much more. We’re making a difference, but the staggering bravery of the Syrian people is their gift to the rest of us. Read this email for the full story, or look at this recent media coverage of Avaaz‘s work on Syria: BBC, CNN, El Pais, TIME, The Guardian, Der Spiegel, AFP.

This morning, 4 western journalists are home safe with their families,the echoes of the horror and heroism of Baba Amr still ringing in their ears. Over 50 Syrian activists, supported by Avaaz, volunteered to rescue them and scores of wounded civilians from the Syrian army’s killzone. Many of those incredible activists have not survived the week.

Abu Hanin is one of the heroes. He’s 26, a poet, and when his community needed him, he took the lead in organizing the citizen journalists that Avaaz has supported to help the voices of Syrians reach the world.The last contact with Abu Hanin was on Thursday, as regime troops closed in on his location. He read his last will and testament to the Avaaz team in Beirut, and told us where he had buried the bodies of the two western journalists killed in the shelling. Since then, his neighborhood of Baba Amr has been a black hole, and we still don’t know his fate.

It’s easy to despair when seeing Syria today, but to honour the dead, we must carry forward the hope they died with.As Baba Amr went dark and fears of massacre spread, Syrians took to the streets — yet again — across the country, in a peaceful protest that showed staggering bravery.

Their bravery is our lesson, the gift of the Syrian people to the rest of us.Because in their spirit, in their courage to face the worst darkness our world has to offer, a new world is being born.

And in that new world, the Syrian people are not alone. Millions of us from every nation have stood with them time and time again, right from the beginning of their struggle. Nearly 75,000 of us have donated almost $3 million to fund people-powered movements and deliver high-tech communications equipment to help them tell their story, and enable the Avaaz team to help smuggle in over $2 million worth of medical supplies. We’ve taken millions of online actions to push for action from the Security Council and the Arab League and for sanctions from many countries, and delivered those online campaigns in dozens of stunts, media campaigns and high-level advocacy meetingswith top world leaders. Together we’ve helped win many of these battles, including for unprecedented action by the Arab League, and oil sanctions from Europe.

Our team in Beirut has also provided a valuable communications hub for brave and skilled activists to coordinate complex smuggling operations and the rescue of the wounded and the journalists. Avaaz does not direct these activities, but we facilitate, support and advise. We have also established safe houses for activists, and supported the outreach and diplomatic engagement of the Syrian National Council — the opposition movement’s fledgling political representative body. Much of the world’s major media have covered Avaaz’s work to help the Syrian people, including features on BBC, CNN, El Pais, TIME, The Guardian, Der Spiegel, AFPand many more, citing our “central role” in the Syrian peaceful protest movement.

Today, a dozen more nightmares like that visited on the city of Homs are unfolding across Syria. The situation will get worse before it gets better. It will be bloody, and complicated, and as some protesters take up arms to defend themselves, the line between right and wrong will blur. But President Assad’s brutal regime will fall, and there will be peace, and elections, and accountability. The Syrian people simply will not stop until that happens — and it may happen sooner than we all think.

Every expert told us at the beginning that an uprising in Syria was unthinkable. But we sent in satellite communications equipment anyway. Because our community knows something that the experts and cynics don’t — that people power and a new spirit of citizenship are sweeping our world today, and they are fearless, and unstoppable, and will bring hope to the darkest places. Marie Colvin, an American journalist covering the violence in Homs, told Avaaz before she died, “I’m not leaving these people.” And neither will we.

With hope, and admiration for the Syrian people and courageous citizens everywhere,

Ricken, Wissam, Stephanie, Alice, David, Antonia, Will, Sam, Emma, Wen-Hua, Veronique and the whole Avaaz team

P.S. If you want to do more, click here to help keep our lifeline of hope into Syria open:
https://secure.avaaz.org/en/smuggle_hope_into_syria_rb/?vl



Avaaz.org is a 13-million-person global campaign network
that works to ensure that the views and values of the world’s people shape global decision-making. (“Avaaz” means “voice” or “song” in many languages.) Avaaz members live in every nation of the world; our team is spread across 13 countries on 4 continents and operates in 14 languages. Learn about some of Avaaz’s biggest campaigns here, or follow us on Facebook or Twitter.

“The Whole World Is Watching! The Whole World Is Watching!”

7 Oct

Sign Petition

Does that chant sound familiar? It’s what the crowd at Occupy Wall Street began crying 2 nights ago when a police officer began swinging his baton into the crowd without provocation, and police allegedly pepper sprayed journalists.
Sign our letter with CREDO to NYC Mayor Mike Bloomberg and the NYPD: trampling on protesters is not acceptable in Cairo or New York. Let’s protect the constitutional rights of the brave Occupy Wall Street patriots, not desecrate them.
We just broke 100,000 signatures on our letter for a good reason: Americans know the NYPD shouldn’t beat ’em – it should join ’em.
Thank you for all you do to make this movement real.

Sincerely,
John Sellers, The Other 98%
Want to support our work? We have a tiny staff ensuring your donations go a long way. You can chip in here.

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